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What are common & Severe Chickenpox Vaccine Side Effects? – 2022

Chickenpox Vaccine Side Effects – Coronavirus is not the only virus in the world that is causing disease and becoming the reason for the death of millions of people. The world has already been hit with different kinds of viruses at different times.

Chickenpox is one of the primary examples of a disease caused by any virus. It is among the most contagious infections caused by the virus. Chickenpox usually affects kids and youngsters, and it can have several types of symptoms, including blisters.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggest everyone get vaccinated for chickenpox along with coronavirus. Today, we will discuss everything related to chickenpox vaccine side effects to make sure you are making the right decision.

Side effects of chickenpox vaccine

Before we discuss anything else related to the vaccine of chickenpox, let’s first discuss the main query of the day, which is the side effects of the chickenpox vaccine.

As per the official website of the National Health Service and the Centers for Disease Control and prevention, everyone below the age of 2 is the most vulnerable to developing chickenpox.

At the same time, they have also mentioned that there can be some side effects, and you should not get to worry about those common side effects.

Common side effects of the chickenpox vaccine

We will discuss both common and severe side effects of the chickenpox vaccine. Let’s start with the common side effects of the chickenpox vaccine, and later we will switch to severe.

Fever

Fever is among the most common side effects of the chickenpox vaccine, and the Centers for Disease Control and prevention mentioned on its official website that anyone who gets a vaccine for chickenpox might develop a fever.

It is going to be a temporary situation, and you will feel better within 24 to 48 hours. Usually, it is not a thing you should be worried about, but you can consult with your doctor anytime you want.

Pain

The second thing you or your kid might experience after getting the vaccine for chickenpox is temporary pain and stiffness in the joints. The chances of anyone developing symptoms such as pain and stiffness in joints are low, but there is a probability, and we cannot ignore it.

Most health experts in the world have suggested that everyone take some over-the-counter medication when feeling pain in their joints, but it must be recommended by your health care professional. Kindly do not take any medicine on your own.

Impact on the spot

Apart from all that, the Centers for Disease Control and prevention also suggest that anyone can get a sore arm from the shot of the vaccine and a mild rash at the same spot. Both of the things are going to be temporary, and you will feel better after 24 to 48 hours. You can call your doctor right away and consult for any over-the-counter medication or ointment to lower the soreness and rash caused by the vaccine.

Chickenpox Vaccine Side Effects
Chickenpox Vaccine Side Effects

Severe side effects of chickenpox vaccine

Along with a small list of common side effects, there are some severe side effects of the chickenpox vaccine. Under any circumstances, you should never ignore the severe side effects of the chickenpox vaccine or any other vaccine.

You should consult with your health care provider regarding these severe side effects. You might require hospitalization if you develop these severe side effects.

Allergic reaction

One of the most common severe side effects of the chickenpox vaccine is an allergic reaction. Any chickenpox vaccine is not allergic-free. If you are already allergic to any ingredients used in chicken pox vaccines, you might develop symptoms like an allergic reaction. 

Usually, people take chickenpox vaccines under the guidance of a health care provider, and you are advised to stay in the hospital or clinic for at least 15 to 20 minutes after you have received your vaccine.

In case you start developing symptoms such as rash, difficulty while breathing and swallowing face and tongue, then you should consult with your doctor, as these are the classic signs of allergic reaction. 

Who should not get the chickenpox vaccine?

Along with everything else, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention of the United States and the National Health Service of England has issued a list on their respective websites for people who should not get a vaccine for chickenpox.

Pregnancy

First of all, women who are pregnant or planning to get pregnant in the next few days should not get a vaccine for chickenpox as it can cause severe complications for the woman and unborn baby. Health experts worldwide suggest that every adult woman take a pregnancy test before getting administered the chickenpox vaccine.

Fever

If you already have a fever or you have an active infection, then you should avoid getting the chicken pox vaccine as it also contains side effects such as fever. Mixing both things can increase your chances of developing severe cases of fever and other side effects.

Low immune system

Lastly, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend people who already have weak immune systems not get vaccinated with the chickenpox vaccine. If you are already struggling with any chronic disease such as cancer or leukemia, then you should not get vaccinated with chickenpox.

The CDC suggests everyone suffering from any disease consult their doctor before getting any vaccine, including the chickenpox vaccine.

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Where to get the chickenpox vaccine?

The chickenpox vaccine is available at any major pharmacy throughout the nation. You can easily create an appointment using the official website of Walgreens, CVS Pharmacy, and Rite Aid pharmacy. At the same time, chickenpox work scenes are available at pediatrics and Nearby community health care centers.

What is the right time to get a vaccine for chickenpox?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend those chicken pox vaccines for every child in the United States. The official website of the CDC suggests everyone get vaccinated for the chickenpox vaccine when they are 12 to 15 months old. The second dose of the vaccine can be administered at age four to six years. Apart from that, people who have not been vaccinated for chickenpox can also get vaccinated anytime they want.

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